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Copenhagen, Denmark

Copenhagen is a very friendly and accessible city to travelers with disabilities. Although Copenhagen has a lot of cobble stone lined streets, the city has made many alterations and enhancements to make the sidewalks accessible. Additionally, quite a few hotels in different categories have accessible accommodations, parking is easy, major department stores have elevators to all the floors and many of the top tourist destinations are accessible.

Museum of Denmark (Nationalmuseet)
Museum of Denmark (Nationalmuseet) is Denmark’s largest collection of cultural history. The Museum covers Danish history from the earliest of settlements to the present day. Through archeological treasures, artifacts, descriptions and information, visitors get a great deal of knowledge and understanding of Denmark and the Danes. The rooms are marked by ‘Ages’ and can take a while getting through so it is recommended to choose the exhibitions you want to see. The museum does not charge an admission fee, a big bonus in the expensive city of Copenhagen. The museum is accessible and has small lifts that will carry individuals in wheelchairs from floor to floor. The lifts are small though and for individuals in larger wheelchairs, scooters or powerchairs, you may not have the ability to explore every floor. For visitors with low vision, the museum has equipment to magnify both exhibits and texts.

Carlsberg Brewery
Carlsberg Brewery is one of the Nordic region’s oldest breweries. Founded by J.C. Jacobsen, the Brewery reveals the compelling story about the founder and his son, Carl. At the brewery, visitors go on a self guided tour and learn about the historical development of the breweries; visit the ‘laboratory’ to see how beers are made; view the outdoor statue garden, which includes a small version of ‘The Little Mermaid;’ and visit the horse stables to pet and see the draft horses that used to pull their older wagons. The self-guided tour enables visitors to spend as much – or as little – time as they’d like in each of the different areas. The tour ends in the Jacobsen Brewhouse, in Bar Jacobsen. The entry price to the Brewery includes two beers or sodas from Bar Jacobsen. The new aroma room allows visitors to discover their favourite smells, and based on the combination of their chosen aromas, to find their favourite beer in the bar. Unlike some other brewery tours, the Carlsberg Brewery allows visitors to choose from a variety of beers. Carlsberg Visitors Centre is accessible for disabled persons and has obtained the accessibility label through the Danish Accessibility Association. Wheelchair users will not be able to visit the bottle collection on the first floor and the malting section in the basement.

Stroget
Located in the center of Copenhagen, Stroget is the longest pedestrian shopping area in Europe. The strip includes some of the city’s most famous and expensive stores as well as souvenir shops, chain stores and restaurants. The area is great for people watching; the plethora of open air cafes enables visitors to do just that. Stroget gets crowded and shopping items are generally higher so it’s also recommended to also go down the side streets and discover some hidden gems. The streets that make up Stroget are accessible for individuals in wheelchairs and mobility scooters. Some of the stores and restaurants are not accessible but there are many that have ramps. To experience the energy of Copenhagen and because there are a good amount of accessible places to visit, Stroget makes a good destination stop.

Tivoli Gardens
Surprisingly, although Tivoli Gardens is the second oldest amusement park in the world, it is one of the first amusement parks in the world to receive the Danish Accessibility Label. Along with an abundance of rides, Tivoli Gardens also has restaurants, theater shows, games and great landscaping/gardens. Tivoli Gardens’ admission is a little costly but especially for amusement park enthusiasts and those traveling with children, this is a good destination. Tivoli Gardens provides ramps for easier access, wherever there is no direct access to the restaurants, venues etc. They recommend that all wheelchair users inform the facility of their intent to bring a wheelchair and to bring a companion if plans include going on the rides.